Tag Archives: Encourage

Be Encouraged: This too Shall Pass

Some seasons are so challenging. God will bring us through these seasons and strengthen us in them.

Tapestry is with Michelle in South Africa

An encouraging story about a mom who homeschools in South AfricaThis interview is part of a series called Tapestry is Everywhere!”, in which we learn from Tapestry users who are applying the curriculum in surprising ways or places. In this article we’ll meet Michelle, a homeschooling mom and Tapestry user who lives in South Africa!

Michelle, how long have you lived in South Africa?

We’ve been here almost eighteen years.  My husband is a pastor and involved in training other pastors and missionaries as well. When my husband left for university, his father decided he didn’t want to follow the American dream and wanted to use his gifts for the Gospel.  So he moved the family to Kenya and my husband spent his summers there.  He gained a vision from that and when he graduated from seminary he (and I) went to teach other pastors in South Africa.  Now he primarily pastors a church and also trains others on the side.  All five of our children have been born here, including a child whom we adopted.  When I was in college I was studying Christian education, hoping either to homeschool my own children on the mission field or to educate other children.

What made Tapestry stand out?

I had been trying to put together my own stuff for a long time, and then another missionary friend shared her TOG file with me.  At first I almost felt sick because it seemed so overwhelming, but then I saw that actually it had put together for me EVERYTHING that I needed in an integrated way that would shape their thinking and equip them for life.  The only thing that made me nervous at that point was that my mentors with similar educational philosophies in America hadn’t told me about it yet.  So I wrote to them and they said, “Oh, we started doing that a year ago and forgot to tell you!” I forgave them for that, but they had to take me book shopping as an apology when I got back to the states.

Speaking of that, what do you do for books?

 We are almost the only American family in our group.  Sometimes somebody coming to visit can put some in a suitcase, or sometimes we do orders, but then the postal service goes on strike… so it’s a huge commitment for these ladies to do it.  But there’s just nothing else like it in the world and also Tapestry has granted us many scholarships.  One of our ladies was just in tears when she received her scholarship.

How big is your co-op?

For many years it was a small group… just a few families.  When my oldest son got to be old enough that I really wanted to have discussion peers for him, we began to hope that the group could expand.  We prayed for five families and the Lord gave us five families.  The next year we prayed for ten families and the Lord gave us eleven families.  Now we have eighteen families.

What things did you like about Tapestry that made it a good fit for your co-op?

It’s because all our students are able to do the same topics in the same weeks across all their different ages and learning levels.  We just had one family join our group that was using another program with their children who have some special needs.  Their children are way below grade level.  But Tapestry is so flexible that they were able to just slot in with our Upper Grammar children without feeling in any way inferior, and we can tailor the learning levels for the learning level and ability of each child.

How do you address the challenge of including African history in a US-based curriculum?

When moms ask me why they should do a curriculum that involves so much US history, I explain that we are studying the superpowers that have shaped the world, and so just as we study ancient Egypt or Greece or Rome or Persia, so also we study modern superpowers like America.  As they see how these different empires or nations function and influence the rest of the world, they will be better able to consider how these superpowers affect their own country.  We also do take time in the weeks that cover Africa to do more with Africa.  We had one of the grandfathers come in during the week when we were studying the Anglo-Boer war and had him show us his artifacts from that.  We also replaced an entire American history unit with African history.

Is homeschooling growing in South Africa?

Yes, it’s definitely on the rise.  For many years we only had a couple of families in our co-op.  Now, homeschooling is getting bigger.  If you use the government system where you don’t have to pay fees, there will be at least 50 students in a class with very few resources.  Otherwise you have to send them to a private school with very high fees.  So, people are looking for a middle option and looking abroad quite widely.  Some do online options, some do other things, etc.

How do you make homeschooling work with such a big co-op, especially when you mentioned that you sometimes need to drop everything and help friends out in the bush?

Well, my older three children are independent.  My youngest three, including the one who is still learning to read, take up more of my time of course.

I think Tapestry actually saves me a lot of time, because I know that so much will be covered on co-op day.  For instance, we decided to do a D writing class as well, so it’s pretty much 6-9th in that class and it was hard for me to find the time to do writing assignments with my students, but because I teach that class I put a lot of effort into it.  However, other teachers cover other subjects, so I don’t have to do nearly as much of that.  On Thursdays I know that great parent-teachers who are gifted will do hands-on activities and maps and lap books and so on.

Has there been anything fun or weird or interesting that comes up in studying Tapestry as South Africans that wouldn’t necessarily come up in America?

Well, at dinner a little while ago with our co-op friends who are from Zambia and the Congo, we were discussing American politics and they were asking what we thought.  Socialism came up as a topic and they were asking us “What is that?”  Most of the liberation movements in South Africa were led by socialists, so they think socialism is good… and so do the people here of European descent who also have a more socialist background with free health care, etc.  So then one of my older sons jumped in and began to explain all about Socialism and Stalin and Mao and helping African adults to understand the dangers of the socialistic worldview.  At the end of that evening, my friend said, “We are homeschooling our children because we want them to have this; we want them to understand culture and vote well, etc.  But how are we going to reach the rest of the children in this country so that they understand and so that they can vote well?  That really challenged me to think beyond my own small family and group, so actually of late I have begun to think about trying to start a good Christian school for our area.

Is there anything you’d like to ask as a prayer request?

I’d like to ask for prayers that families in South Africa can keep homeschooling their children.  So far it is still legal, but the government is not supportive and we don’t know how long this privilege will last.  Also, we ask for prayer to persevere as the moms face some things that I think moms in America may soon be facing.  One wife has a husband who has been out of work for a year because he won’t pay bribes.  Another husband is in similar trouble because he wouldn’t tell a lie.  People are having to stand firm for their principles, with real financial costs, and they need prayer.  Finally, I’d ask that we be able to find a way to bless more families in this country with Christian education, because right now there is a very small minority who can.  When I was doing a women’s conference recently in an African township, I don’t think any of those women were able to stay home with their children.  They all had to work, because our liberal constitution makes it easier for women to get work than for men to get work, and so they wind up bearing the burden of being breadwinners.

A Delightful Combination

The fabulous combination of Classical Education and Charlotte Mason that makes up Tapestry of Grace.When I first started researching curriculum for my family, I knew I wanted one that both used quality books in the way that Charlotte Mason encourages, and gave us the depth and worldview training that a Classical education promises. I was thrilled to realize that I could get all of that by using Tapestry of Grace! Using this curriculum, I knew that I would be able to give my kids a rich education in the humanities. This made me very excited!

But, I had three young children and a very busy life. Among other things, we had just moved to a new city. I knew that my good planning intentions would quickly fall apart as things began to get busy. So, I added my voice to others who had been asking for a chart that would break Tapestry’s weekly assignments into daily, bite-sized pieces. The danger of making such requests when you are involved in the family business is that you get pulled into the project! I was drafted to help! But, since I love planning and making schedules, I was happy to jump into it.

As I dove into the Planning Aids project and started looking through all the books, I learned some interesting things about the curriculum that I want to share with you.

First, the book selection is amazing! The quality of the books and the fabulous illustrations distracted me! I would catch myself getting caught up in some of the assignments when I was just supposed to be assigning daily readings by page number. As I looked through all the books, I became even more convinced that Tapestry of Grace is amazing! If you are looking for a curriculum that embraces a Charlotte Mason approach for younger students, this is a fabulous choice. Glancing ahead, I saw that Tapestry would grow with my students, providing a high-quality, classical approach to learning at the Dialectic (Jr. High) and Rhetoric (High School) levels. Tapestry gives us all the tools for that, too!

Second, I love the amount of “non-western” history that Tapestry covers in both the book list and the weekly topics. Here I found the kind of integration that I want in my children’s humanities curriculum. I want my children to know that there is more to the world than Europe and North America. Tapestry includes information about Africa, China, India, the Middle East, South America, and Canada, fitting it into appropriate places for Western students. Tapestry of Grace covers subjects, countries and histories all over the world.

Third, I learned that Year 2 (the Fall of Rome through the American Colonial period) is my favorite year of Tapestry! I know I am biased (because it includes my favorite time period in history), but between the amazing books and the wonderful hands on activities that can be integrated with the learning, I decided that if I needed to spread any one Tapestry year over two years, I would pick Year 2.

It’s worth saying again. As I have worked with the curriculum over the past several years, I have been so delighted to see that at the Grammar levels, Tapestry is strongly committed to Charlotte Mason’s principles, while embracing a richly classical approach, as well. Tapestry has delightful living books for you to read aloud.  It encourages discussion and narration rather than worksheets. Yet, in what I think is a perfect blend, Tapestry flows into a more traditionally classical approach as it encourages Socratic discussion and the reading of as many original works as is feasible for the age of the student at the Dialectic and Rhetoric levels. I am so excited for the humanities education that I will be able to give my children using Tapestry of Grace for their homeschool!

If you want to see all the books we use in Tapestry of Grace, check out our sister company, Bookshelf Central! If you want to see firsthand how we integrate all the subjects while keeping your whole family on the same time period, check out our three week sample!