Tapestry is with Jillane and Joelle in Canada

Tapestry in Canada Final

This interview is part of a series called Tapestry is Everywhere!”, in which we learn from Tapestry users who are applying the curriculum in surprising ways or places. In this article we’ll meet Jillane and Joelle, who are parent-teachers homeschooling with Tapestry in Canada!

Where in Canada do you live, ladies, and what is your background?

Joelle: I’m an immigrant to Canada from Martinique, which is a small French island in the Caribbean. I live towards the eastern coast of Canada, right at the border of Toronto and Mississauga.

Jillane: I live in west-central Canada, and I’m a native Canadian. I am also a former public school teacher.

What’s one quirky thing about Canadian culture that you really enjoy and would love to share with your American neighbors?

Joelle: Beaver tail! We eat beaver tails in eastern Canada. It’s not actually a beaver’s tail; it’s a pastry shaped like a beaver’s tail. You might eat it with apple cinnamon topping or with a Nutella topping–that’s very popular right now. We even have beaver tail stands in town.

Jillane: I’ve definitely heard of beaver tails here in western Canada. I was thinking of maple syrup because it is of course a very Canadian thing. Our flag has a maple leaf on it, obviously. David’s Tea is a newer Canadian thing: it’s a specialty tea place based in Toronto and is the largest in the country. I hear they’ve even opened one in the United States! We’re also a nation of immigrants and have a very multicultural culture.

What is the strangest cultural or historical thing you’ve ever heard about America—something that just made you go “huh…”

Joelle: Most states in America seem to have higher speed limits: they go faster than we do here on the Canadian highways.

Jillane: All the southern traditions and dishes seem strange to me… much as an igloo might be strange to southerners! Though I’m always surprised at how many Americans seem to think we Canadians live in igloos, and most of us wouldn’t even know how to build one.

Joelle, I know you love to read theology. Who would be your biggest theological hero?

I do read a lot of theology and love theology. Somebody like Luther would be a hero of mine. His strength and personality and willingness to fight for what he thought needed to be said are inspiring to me.

Jillane, who would be your biggest Canadian historical hero?

Jillane: I’m having trouble picking one because of all the ones we’ve read about! For instance, today I was reading about Joe Boyle and how he was involved in the dredging up in the Klondike, and I didn’t even know about him! I don’t think many Canadians would. So I’m always discovering new Canadian heroes hidden between the leaves of our history.

 What is your biggest reason for using Tapestry?

Joelle: The main reason for me is the Christian worldview. The history is very full and it’s clear that the lead author (Marcia Somerville) has a strong background in history, as well as a strong Christian worldview. I also love that it’s not just American history, but world history and geography.

Jillane: My main reason is the worldview too, and also the classical approach where we can all talk around the table about the same material.

 How much Canadian history do you include as you go through Tapestry?

Joelle: I haven’t tried to add to add in a lot of Canadian history. My oldest student is in the dialectic level. Next year I will begin to try to add in Canadian history for my students.

Jillane: I really didn’t want to let go of any of American or World history. Fortunately, Canadian history doesn’t really pick up much until the middle of Year 2 or in Year 3. I began by including books on Canadian history where appropriate. For instance, the Klondike Gold Rush was a big thing in Canada as well. So I might include a Canadian book and then have my students work along at a project related to Canadian history that would tie in to what they were studying in Tapestry. Then, my third step has been to try to include the occasional tie-in question when we are doing discussion scripts at the dialectic and rhetoric levels.

Jillane, you’ve shared with me before that actually the American Civil War had a big effect on Canada. What was that effect?

The Civil War had a big effect on Canadian history because it was one of the primary reasons that pushed independent colonies (under Britain) to unite. This is what birthed Canada under the British North American Act. When we consider how different each of the colonies were, it is nothing short of God’s hand and perhaps the push of the Civil War that brought unity to Canada in such a short time frame. In fact, 2017 is Canada’s 150th year Celebration of Confederation (the union of the colonies into what is now Canada)! As such, our country will be hosting events to celebrate and I was hoping to inspire home schoolers to teach/learn about that time period prior to July 1, 2017.

If there were one or two things that you would love to see happen in the community of Canadian Tapestry users, what would they be?

Joelle: I’d love to find a way for the printed versions of curricula (not just Tapestry but any American curriculum) to be a little less expensive in Canada. The shipping costs are hard for us, so it’s a good thing there are digital versions available. I’d also love to see Canadian Tapestry users get connected to each other, maybe to know about things like Virtual co-ops. I’d want them to know that those are available as a way for people who live far apart to get connected.

Jillane: I agree with Joelle: books are really expensive to ship to Canada. Besides that, I would love for Canadians to get to learn about how American and Canadian histories are tied together. I didn’t learn that as a child, but it’s been so exciting for me to see that and make the connections with Tapestry. It makes me want other Canadians to see how our history ties in with world history and American history. Tapestry explains so well that God is sovereign and has control over all history, but I want us to see how we are part of that.

Do you have any specific dreams about how you’d like to serve other homeschoolers?

Joelle: I would love to be available for people to give ideas on how to adapt the curriculum to fit their particular needs or limitations, whether budget wise, or homeschooling style or whatever. I have started a Facebook group for Canadian Tapestry users and I would love to see more of us get connected. If you are in Canada and interested, I hope you will consider joining my group!

Jillane: I have developed some specifically “Canadian” threads for my children because I want them to know our history just as well as American and world history. We have a lot of Canadian books and I spend a lot of time trying to figure out how that fits in. It’s been a lot of work for me to develop and I don’t necessarily just want to throw that out there, but I would love to find a way to share it that makes sense.

It was exciting to interview Jillane and Joelle about their experiences with Tapestry in Canada, because as we talked it became clear that Tapestry of Grace is not just a curriculum about American history, but is actually a curriculum that brings a biblical perspective to the complex tapestry of world history. We will see this idea unfold further as the series continues: stay tuned!

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